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GMAT

GMAT

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a computer adaptive test (CAT) intended to assess certain analytical, writing, quantitative, verbal, and reading skills in written English for use in admission to a graduate management program, such as an MBA. It requires knowledge of certain grammar and knowledge of certain algebra, geometry, and arithmetic. The GMAT does not measure business knowledge or skill, nor does it measure intelligence. According to the test owning company, the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), the GMAT assesses analytical writing and problem-solving abilities, while also addressing data sufficiency, logic, and critical reasoning skills that it believes to be vital to real-world business and management success. It can be taken up to five times a year. Each attempt must be at least 16 days apart.

MAKS BELA - GMAT COACHING AMBATTUR | CHENNAI

Our unique approach to GMAT coaching has produced incredible outcomes. Our expert tutors will share tips, tricks, and strategies to tackle GMAT questions by enhancing students' existing knowledge and skills so that they are confident and calm on the day of the test.

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MAKS BELA Advantage

MAKS BELA Education

Other GMAT Prep Programs

1

Innovative Teaching

Highly researched and advanced test taking strategies with ‘MAKS BELA Techniques’.

Traditional Teaching

Ineffective strategies and learn by Rote techniques.

2

Top Quality Instructors

Talented teachers with vast experience, handpicked through an extensive selection process.

Unreliable Teacher Quality

Low quality instructors with limited experience.

3

Personalized Small Batches

Highly interactive sessions tailored to the unique needs of individual students.

Generic Large batches

Fail to recognize individual students’ strengths and weaknesses.

4

Performance Monitoring

Constant monitoring to analyze test taking strategies, application and speed.

No Analysis

No focus at all on performance analysis.

5

Real Practice Tests

Actual practice questions and mock exams from the writers of the GMAT.

Self created Practice Tests

Unapproved, untested questions written by companies not affiliated with the GMAT.

Our Package Includes

  • Diagnostic Test with detailed score reporting and essay feedback

  • Roadmap for GMAT Prep

  • Customized lectures and group activities

  • Concept reinforcement and test taking strategies

  • Daily Homework and Comprehensive Study Schedule

  • Constant Performance Analysis & Reporting

  • 8 Full Length Mock tests with detailed analysis

  • Complete Study Material

GMAT Format and timing

The GMAT exam consists of four sections: An analytical writing assessment, integrated reasoning, the quantitative section, and the verbal section. Total testing time is three and a half hours, but test takers should plan for a total time of approximately four hours, with breaks. Test takers have 30 minutes for the analytical writing assessment and another 30 minutes to work through 12 questions, which often have multiple parts, on the integrated reasoning section and are given 75 minutes to work through 37 questions in the quantitative section and another 75 minutes to get through 41 questions in the verbal section.

Section

Duration in minutes

Number of questions

Analytical writing assessment

30

1 essay

Integrated reasoning

30

12

Quantitative

75

37

Verbal

75

41

The quantitative and verbal sections of the GMAT exam are both multiple-choice and are administered in the computer-adaptive format, adjusting to a test taker’s level of ability. At the start of the quantitative and verbal sections, test takers are presented with a question of average difficulty. As questions are answered correctly, the computer presents the test taker with increasingly difficult questions and as questions are answered incorrectly the computer presents the test taker with questions of decreasing difficulty. This process continues until test takers complete each section, at which point the computer will have an accurate assessment of their ability level in that subject area and come up with a raw score for each section.

Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA)

The AWA consists of one 30-minute writing task—analysis of an argument. It is important to be able to analyze the reasoning behind a given argument and write a critique of that argument. The essay will be given two independent ratings and these ratings are averaged together to determine the test taker's AWA score. One rating is given by a computerized reading evaluation and another is given by a person at GMAC who will read and score the essay themselves without knowledge of what the computerized score was. The automated essay-scoring engine is an electronic system that evaluates more than 50 structural and linguistic features, including organization of ideas, syntactic variety, and topical analysis. If the two ratings differ by more than one point, another evaluation by an expert reader is required to resolve the discrepancy and determine the final score.

The analytical writing assessment is graded on a scale of 1 (the minimum) to 6 (the maximum) in half-point intervals (a score of zero means the answer was gibberish or obviously not written on the assigned topic or the test taker failed to write anything at all on the AWA).

Essay score

Description

1

An essay that is deficient.

2

An essay that is flawed.

3

An essay that is limited.

4

An essay that is adequate.

5

An essay that is strong.

6

An essay that is outstanding.

Integrated reasoning

Integrated Reasoning (IR) is a relatively new section (introduced in June 2012) designed to measure a test taker’s ability to evaluate data presented in multiple formats from multiple sources. The skills being tested by the integrated reasoning section were identified in a survey of 740 management faculty worldwide as important for today’s incoming students.[16] The integrated reasoning section consists of 12 questions (which often consist of multiple parts themselves) in four different formats: graphics interpretation, two-part analysis, table analysis, and multi-source reasoning. Integrated reasoning scores range from 1-8. Like the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA), this section is scored separately from the quantitative and verbal section. Performance on the IR and AWA sections do not contribute to the total GMAT score.

The integrated reasoning section includes four question types: table analysis, graphics interpretation, multi-source reasoning, and two-part analysis.[16] In the table analysis section, test takers are presented with a sort able table of information, similar to a spreadsheet, which has to be analyzed. Each question will have several statements with opposite-answer options (e.g., true/false, yes/no), and test takers click on the correct option. Graphics interpretation questions ask test takers to interpret a graph or graphical image. Each question has fill-in-the-blank statements with pull-down menus; test takers must choose the options that make the statements accurate. Multi-source reasoning questions are accompanied by two to three sources of information presented on tabbed pages. Test takers click on the tabs and examine all the relevant information, which may be a combination of text, charts, and tables to answer either traditional multiple-choice or opposite-answer (e.g., yes/no, true/false) questions. Two-part analysis questions involve two components for a solution. Possible answers are given in a table format with a column for each component and rows with possible options. Test takers have to choose one response per column.

Quantitative section

The quantitative section of the GMAT seeks to measure the ability to reason quantitatively, solve quantitative problems, interpret graphic data, and analyze and use information given in a problem. Questions require knowledge of certain algebra, geometry, and arithmetic. There are two types of quantitative questions: problem solving and data sufficiency. The use of calculators is not allowed on the quantitative section of the GMAT. Test takers must do their math work out by hand using a wet erase pen and laminated graph paper which are given to them at the testing center. Scores range from 0 to 60, although GMAC only reports scores between 6 and 51.

Problem solving questions are designed to test the ability to reason quantitatively and to solve quantitative problems. Data sufficiency is a question type unique to the GMAT designed to measure the ability to understand and analyze a quantitative problem, recognize what information is relevant or irrelevant and determine at what point there is enough information to solve a problem or recognize the fact that there is insufficient information given to solve a particular problem.

Verbal section

The verbal section of the GMAT exam includes the following question types: reading comprehension, critical reasoning, and sentence correction. Each question type gives five answer options from which to select. Verbal scores range from 0 to 60, however scores below 9 and above 44 are rare.

According to GMAC, the reading comprehension question type attempts to test your ability to analyze information and draw a conclusion. Reading comprehension passages can be anywhere from one paragraph to several paragraphs long.[19] According to GMAC, the critical reasoning question type seeks to put your reasoning skills to use.[18][20] According to GMAC, the sentence correction question type attempts to test your grammar and effective communication skills. From the available answer options, the test taker should select the most effective construction that best expresses the intent of the sentence.

Scoring

The total GMAT score ranges from 200 to 800 and measures performance on the quantitative and verbal sections together (performance on the AWA and IR sections do not count toward the total score, those sections are scored separately). Scores are given in increments of 10 (e.g. 540, 550, 560, 570, etc.). From the most recent data released by GMAC, the average GMAT score of all test takers is about 540.

The score distribution conforms to a bell curve with a standard deviation of approximately 100 points, meaning that 68% of examinees score between 440 and 640. More precisely, the mean score is 545.6 with a standard deviation of 121.07 points.

The final score is not based solely on the last question the examinee answers (i.e. the level of difficulty of questions reached through the computer adaptive presentation of questions). The algorithm used to build a score is more complicated than that. The examinee can make a mistake and answer incorrectly and the computer will recognize that item as an anomaly. If the examinee misses the first question his score will not necessarily fall in the bottom half of the range.

After previewing his/her unofficial GMAT score, a GMAT test taker has two minutes to decide whether to keep or cancel the GMAT score. A cancelled score can be retrieved within 60 days for a fee of $100. After 60 days a cancelled score is not retrievable.

Preparation

Test takers may register for the GMAT either online at mba.com or by calling one of the test centers.To schedule an exam, an appointment must be made at one of the designated test centers. The GMAT may not be taken more than once within 31 days, even if the scores are cancelled. Official GMAT exam study materials are available on the mba.com online store and through third-party vendors. The cost of the exam is $250. All applicants are required to carry their passports, driver's license, or other valid ID to the examination hall without which he or she will not be allowed to take the GMAT exam. Upon completion of the test, test takers have the option of cancelling or reporting their scores. As of July 2014, test takers were allowed to view their score before making this decision.

There are test preparation companies that offer GMAT courses. Many test preparation companies have gone on record stating noteworthy GMAT results, including average or guaranteed score increases over 90 points. Other available test preparation resources include university text books, GMAT preparation books, sample tests, and free web resources.

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